Individual Notes

Note for:   MARY ANN HOLDICH,   1804 - 8 MAY 1879         Index

Individual Note:
     Left 6000 - brother Rev Thomas Peach Holdich.

Individual Notes

Note for:   THOMAS BOULTBEE,   1689 - 29 OCT 1780         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   CLERGYMAN


Individual Notes

Note for:   CHARLES HILTON BOULTBEE,   1823 - 1861         Index

Individual Note:
     NOT ALIVE WHEN 1881 CENSUS WAS TAKEN AS WIFE DESCRIBED AS WIDOWER THERE IS AN ENTRY IN Z.B.'S NORFOLK DIRECTORY THAT GIVES HIM AS A FARMER AT WOODRISING IN NORFOLK IN 1854 (PAGE 820). 1851 Census Transcription has name as Boulter

Individual Notes

Note for:   HANNAH BAKER,   1822 - 2 OCT 1887         Index

Individual Note:
     SHE MAY BE RELATED TO A BENJAMIN BAKER OF ACLE HALL SEE PAGE 559 OF Z.B.'S NORFOLK DIRECTORY. This is almost certain as he looks to have taken over the farm at Woodrising.

Individual Notes

Note for:   ANN MARIA BOULTBEE,   JUN 1848 - 14 DEC 1917         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   FARMERS DAUGHTER

Individual Note:
     UNMARRIED IN 1881 CENSUS LIVING IN WHITTLESEY CAMBS WITH MOTHER

Individual Notes

Note for:   HARRIET ELIZABETH BOULTBEE,   SEP 1849 - DEC 1938         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   GOVERNESS


Individual Notes

Note for:   CHARLES EDWARD BOULTBEE,   DEC 1850 - DEC 1923         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   CHEMIST/DRUGGIST


Individual Notes

Note for:   MARY ANN LOUISA BOSTON,   1853 - DEC 1932         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   CHEMIST/DRUGGIST


Individual Notes

Note for:   CHARLES EDWARD BOULTBEE,   SEP 1880 - 16 AUG 1967         Index

Occupation:   
     Place:   CHEMIST


Individual Notes

Note for:   FRANCIS BRAITHWAITE BOULTBEE,   JUN 1852 - DEC 1906         Index

Individual Note:
     WAS LIVING IN KINGS CROSS LONDON AT TIME OF MOTHERS DEATH IN 1887 1881 census 6 Granville Square, Clerkenwell, London, Middlesex, England

Individual Notes

Note for:   HOWARD BAKER BOULTBEE,   JUN 1853 - 15 FEB 1932         Index

Individual Note:
     Howard Boltbee He was born in Woodrising, Norfold England, in 1854 and
came to New Zealand in the sailing vessel White Rose, landing at
Lyttelton in 1875. He then took up the position of dispenser to Dr
Townsend of Christchurch and in 1882 became a registered chemist. Some
years later he entered into business on his own account at Dunedin. In
1899 he was married at Masterton and went to Marton to live and managed
Darby's wharehouse for a number of years. He then bought a chemist's
business at Mangaweka, moving later from there to Shannon where he
carried on his occupation for some years. From Shannon he moved to
Waikanae, then Pongaroa and finally settled at Norsewood. He was believed
to be the oldest active chemist in New Zealand when he died. He was
always of a bright and benevolent nature which made for him many sincere
friends. His demise removes from our mides a very familiar figure. He was
a red head and was nicknamed "carrot top"

Individual Notes

Note for:   Edith Minnie Farr,   31 OCT 1865 - 26 MAY 1955         Index

Individual Note:
     The Boultbee Family.
Mrs. H.B. Boultbee.
My mother (Mrs. Farr.)
Dad had a large Coach building Factory employing 17 men at Welshpool
Montgomeryshire. Shropshire. The house was of brick and stone, and three
story and underkitchen and a Bake oven we could hide in and did. Dad
severed an artery in a new style saw and died. I was home from Pupil
teaching at Finbury Park College London. N. Fensbury Park, as my Mr.
Finlayson had left to join his brother in Dunedin the Rev W Finlayson so
Mum and I and my 3 brothers came out by sailing vessel Old Lady Jocelyn.
Captain Watt and wife and 2 young men and round by Cape we had 5 mates as
she took frozen meat home. Harry preceded us by steamer. To get a place
for us. He came by Arawa and had work (Coach Painting) in Dunedin the day
he arrived, and got a place for us at Cavershaw. Trams ran from city to
Sunnyvale
From when she was younger.
I was born in Greenwick below the observatory hill but went to live in N
Wales, Montgomeryshire when a year old. My 3 brothers and I had a happy
childhood. I being the eldest in spring, walked miles collecting wild
flowers, Anemones. Primroses, Bluebells, Violets white and purple, later
on single Roses, Honeysuckle, Acorns, later still Beech Filbert
Hazelnut, Walnuts and ground nuts and mushrooms. We had a pony and trap
and mother drove us out on Saturdays, or Father took us fishing on the
canal. It went for miles past our Carriage works, boats carrying some
coal, slate or timber used it and were drawn by 2 donkeys or a horse from
a tow path beside. They had a cabin for shelter along the canal banks at
water edge, we set night lines for eels and long line with hooks on
shorter ones at intervals. We had to be up early or the boatmen would
get our lines and fish with there sinker grabs
A letter written about the trip on Lady Jocelyn
College St.
        Cavershaw
Edith was a teach of music at a private school in London . In 1888, she
with her mother and three brothers came to New Zealand in the sailing
ship Lady Jocelyn and settled in Dunedinw where she took up the
professono on music teachin. For some years the she was accompanist for
the Dundin Harmonic Society she moved to Masterton and married Howard
Boultbee a chemist.
        DUNEDIN
4th March 1889
Dear Mr. Copnal.
I am now fulfilling my promise of writing you an account of my travels to
this new land and hope you will forgive the delay. We sailed from London
on Jan 16th amidst a great deal of bustle. We started at 3 p.m. and were
towed down the river by steam tugs as far as Gravesend where we anchored
for the night as most of the sailors were drunk and the board of trade
officers inspected the ship. We found there were only two passengers
besides ourselves 2 gentlemen in search of - which they both found
on arriving in the - We all suffered severely from seasickness for a
week when we recovered our appetites and enjoyed our roast beef, but the
plum pudding came to grief our black cook did not boil it enough so we
had it for tea. Our food was very good tined meat potatoes condensed milk
cheese jam pickle bottled fruit ect. In abundance and fresh meat
occasionally there were seven live sheep and five pigs besides poultry on
board these were killed as required. The weather was very cold for the
first week then it gradually got warmer and we began to enjoy our voyage
and get accustomed to the trip The Lady Jocelyn is a large ship of
nearly 3000 tons register and was employed carrying troop to India during
the mutiny. She is now employed in the frozen mutton trade and has large
freezing engines. We had 2 cabins each about 8 feet square and containing
2 beds places built against the side of the vessel one window to port
hole and a washstand fixed up in a corner. We occasionally passed other
vessels and spoke to them by means of different coloured flags which were
run up to the stern of the vessel and very quickly answered by the
strangers who reported us on arriving at their port. One day 3 whales
passed quite close to our ship not far from the Island of St. Antonio
which was then in sight it is a large bare looking rock it is as a
coaling station for steamers. One peak being 700 odd ft high.( St.
Antonio or Santo Antao is the most westerly of the Cape de Verde Islands
or Windward Islands It is a great height above sea level and can be seen
a long way off.) One day while we were in the tropics and the ship lying
becalmed I saw the fin of a shark in the distance I shouted " a shark"
and very soon quite a little crowd was gathered watching the fin in the
distance after a while he came within a few yards of the ship and by
climbing on to the little boat at the stern we could see him beneath us
and watched every movement. The captain went for a rope hook and a piece
of pork of about 3 lb. as a bait this was trailing behind the ship and in
a few moments the shark could be seen coming towards it he hook a snap at
it, the men pulled but jerked out of his mouth it was lowered again and
again he took it this time with more effect the hook passing through his
upper lip a rope was then lowered a loop passed over his head and one fin
but owing to his struggle it could not be got over the other fin and
other rope was brought but in lowering it they jerked the hook out of his
mouth and off went the shark out of reach and after a time we gave up all
hopes of seeing him again. We had just finished dinner when we heard that
the shark was again in sight there was a general rush for the stern of
the vessel and sure enough there was the shark after a little swimming
two and fro he turned partly over and took the pork into his large mouth
the hook caught him and as he floated after us we could see down his
immense throat and see his wicked round eyes rolling, his under side was
quite white and his back a green gray. A struggle now began and it seemed
like that he would break away before he could be bound with the ropes so
the chief engineer brought his gun and had two shots at him one passing
through his head and the one passing through his heart and the other down
his throat he now began floundering and wrapped himself round and round
in the coil of rope. He was towed round to the side of the ship and
slowly raised on board. The sailor became very excited and each one
seemed anxious to have a cut at him, he opened his mouth to snap at the
men's feet but they thrust a pole in his mouth and kept there. His heart
was taken out and thrown on deck, where it continued to be beaten until
sunset. In his stomach they found a 7lb beef tin and small milk tin which
had been thrown out in the morning. They threw all the flesh overboard
except a small portion near the tail. Very few sailors will taste shark
flesh. We had some next morning for breakfast and found it very good. He
measured nine feet long, the back bone was cleaned up to make a walking
stick with. The weather was now very hot that we almost lived on deck
under an awning. The pitch boiled between the planks
of the deck and you could not bear your hand on the side of the vessel.
Our poor bird died.
        There was a number of porpoises and flying fish one flew on board,
we preserved it but the rats ate it one night, there were lots of them on
board they got under our pillows and over our heads and everywhere else.
As we approached the Cape of Good Hope it became much colder and
Albatross began to follow the ship we fished for them with pieces of pork
and hook fastened to a strong line several hundred yd. long which were
aloud to float a short distance from the stern, till the Albatrosses came
near, and then we let it out so as not to be seen trailing after the
ship. We succeeded in catching one. It measured 9ft from tip to tip of
the wings, the breast was white and the wings and back were black and
white, the feathers on the breast were about 2 inches deep. We skinned it
and made two pouches from the feet which have two skins when separated,
they make fine tobacco pouches. We still have the wings breast and beak
by us "the beak comes with the letter" On Good Friday we had bad storm
about two o'clock in the morning a wave struck the ship, it sounded like
a cannon it carried 15ft of the bulwarks and rushed down into our cabins
which were soon knee deep and we were taken into the saloon the sailors
following with our beds the storm continued for three days the waves were
as high as the masts. The next Friday we had another storm and again had
to go into the saloon we also had another on the following Friday when
the ship laid over on its side and the waves washing over the deck and
one said was carried away our Captain was alarmed being near the rocks
called the Traps and snares off Stewart Island. The next day land was in
sight the first we had seen for three months and by night were close to
the heads of Port Chalmers. At dusk a bunch of tow soaked oil was lit
as a signal for a pilot and tug boats to tow us into port. Early next
morning we were towed in and anchored about three miles off Port Chalmers
on Sunday the 16th of April 1888. We were delighted with the appearance
of the country its very much like Wales only on a much larger scale one
hill peeping behind another. Gorse and Broom in bloom nearly all the year
round. Went by rail from Port Chalmers to Dunedin a distance of about 12
miles. Dunedin has about 40,000 inhabitants the streets are very wide and
the principle building very handsome mostly of white stone beautifully
carried the main street is about 5 miles long trams run there to all
parts of the city and suburbs. We live about three miles from town in a
nice 6 roomed house built of wood. We have a good garden with fruit
trees, Cherry, Plum, Peach, Raspberries, Strawberries, Currants and
Melons. Vegetables and flowers of all kind, The most tender stand the
winter out of doors, hedges made of geraniums, Fuchsia and Veronica are
common. We keep fowls and ducks. The sea is a nice distance, about a mile
and a half from our house there is a splendid beach, but the sea is too
rough to allow bathing. Marco sharks and Octopus come very near the shore
so a place is cut in the rocks for bathers. There is native bush within
easy distance of town some of which extend for miles and are a confused
tangle Fuchsia trees (as large as Ash trees) Veronicas up to 12ft high
and most splendid evergreen shrubs of all kinds, wild Clematis with white
blossom (as large as your purple ones) hand from the tree tops in
festoons. The ground is covered with ferns of beautiful kinds musk grows
by the brook sides and fills the air with its scent the tree ferns are
lovely some quite 20ft high with fronds 6 or 7 ft long Maori Palms, and
native Flax which is a kind of grass 4 or 5feet high with fronds so
strong that people use them instead of string. There are no snakes wasps
or toads mushrooms grow in the hills. Rabbits are so numerous that men
get a good living destroying them. There are very few English trees of
any size. Willows and Poplars grow fast we have 3 Poplars in front of
our house and two Sycamores. Blue Gum are the largest trees about here
they are very handsome and have pretty white flowers Oak trees grow so
fast here and they are not nearly as hard as they are at home. Fruit is
cheap here Gooseberries, 8lb.for a shilling, Currants and Apples 6 lb. a
shilling strawberries and Raspberries 6 pence a lb. Cherries, Apricots
and Peaches fourpence lb. Plums and Damsons two pence too four pence lb.
Pineapples from threepence to a shilling , Bananas all the year round two
a penny. The vegetables are mostly grown by Chinamen or Chinkies as they
are called and are very cheap and good. Fish is plentiful but entirely
different from those at home. We have Barracuda, very good eating and as
long as a mans leg, for sixpence. Groper, Rock Cod, Blue Cod, Red Cod,
large Crayfish from twopence but no crabs, Lobster or shrimps Mullet a
fish that look like herring but tastes different, Oyster Twopence per dz.
Mussels, Cockles, Periwinkles one can gather for themselves they are
seldom sold. Nearly all dwelling houses are built of wood and roofed with
corrugated iron . There are mostly 3 bedrooms and all on the ground
floor, they have pretty verandahs and bow windows, and each one stands in
its own grounds. Most working men who have been here a few years, own
their own houses. Fires are very frequent there was three last Friday.
Everyone insures as it is impossible to save them and the firemen can
only prevent it spreading. Imported clothing and boots are very dear but
those made in the colony are very cheep, they have large factories for
making tweed flannels and blankets and boots there are also soap candles
and jam factories. Bread is good and cheap , flour 5/s a bag if 50lbs
soap from twopence a bar half a sheep for 3/- beef from twopence to
fourpence Pork 6d bacon 8d beef sausages 3d beef from twopence to
fourpence, Pork 6d bacon 8d beef sausages 3d sheep's kidneys 4d per dz.
fouls 1/6 each rabbits 3 for 1/- . House rent is rather high 6 roomed
housed fetch 10 shillings a week people live very extravagantly here and
are splendid cooks. There are many public holidays Christmas which comes
in midsummer and New Year, St. Andrews day, a day and half for races
March 23rd which is the anniversary of the founding of Otago, Easter,
Queens Birthday, Prince of Wales Birthday and one or two others when
every shop shut up and picnics excursions by land and sea are all the go.
They call their food grub or meat as they do at home, but tucker, and on
holidays it is amusing to see the baskets of tucker and milk tins called
'Billies' people use these too boil their tea in when picnics on the
beach or hills people eat a deal more here than they do at home. Boys
don't think rich plum cake any treat as they have it for tea every day
that's the working class, and mutton chops are cheapest breakfast you can
get. We have had a splendid summer, no rain for 3 months except a few
showers at night, we find mushrooms in good quantities. At times we have
fearful high winds here and when it rains it does rain and lasts for a
week without stopping. The temperature varies very much, sometimes we get
a very cold day in the middle of summer and a hot one in the middle of
winter and hot scorching winds are very frequent. Snow falls sometimes
but never stops on the ground and only very thin ice but we an see snow
half the year on the high mountains. We all like the country very much
and wouldn't like to come back , work is rather scarce but we have been
fortunate . Harry has constant work at 8/- per day for eight hours. His
last fortnightly wages were Five pounds, eighteen shillings. Minnie got
into a large drapers shop a week or two after we arrived as saleswomen in
the mantle Dept. at a good salary. She lives at home and takes music
pupils in the evening as shops close at 6.p.m. She has a guinea a quarter
for each pupil. I am in a large wholesale and retail boot and leather
warehouse, and have only twenty pounds a year to begin with. Mother stops
at home and keeps house for us all. Arthur goes to school. We are all
well and happy and better off than we ever where before.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Edwin Farr,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     He was a coach builder Mariner

Individual Notes

Note for:   (Jane). Hannah Eliza Jane Hopkins,   6 MAR 1882 - 25 FEB 1973         Index

Individual Note:
     Notes Joan took when she was on a facts taking tour of Norsewood
Jane bought the house at top Norsewood from a Mr Mariboe, the first
photographer in Norsewood. He did family portraits.
Biddy Ridge-- The house and secton were lift to Stella as noone else
wanted them. Stella got the garden back into shape she loved the flowers
Stella had anothe house shifted onto the section Mr Sutton lives ther
now. Jame remaned in her h ouse until Alan took her to Gisborne where she
is buried. Alan bought a cottage down the road from him where she lived.
Kathy Barnes -- Jane in her latter days wore a light grey suit like
quakers outfit. She was a strong ladywho went for long walks into the
fanges. She loved the bush and hills and country side. Kathy as a child
would visit Jane a wonderful old lady Whe would welcom children in and
allow them to watch her paint, however she didnt suffer fools gladly and
would let you know if she didn't want you there. Jane would often go
searching for four leaf clovers and always find them"you just have to
look" she would say. She would often walk, looking with her hands behind
her back. She was a nice, lovely person who loved poetry and flowers. She
would tell you stories too. She did a lot of walking.
None of Jane's paintings faded She would paint with eggwhite with her
paints.
Jane built her own extensions herself as she was a stron and capable and
forthright perso
Beth -- Jane would give talks to the women's Institute on paintings when
she would brush aside the need for knowledge of technique - "just get the
paints out and get going...." very matter of fact, no nonsense " There's
nothing fancy about painting...." she would say.
Jane designed the first Health stamp 1932
Cemetry Thomas Brenkley Born 1874 died 4.2.1949
Jane Brenkley born 7.3.1882 died 25.2.1973
Jane had 8 girls and 3 boys Vernon died and grave is in Norsewood cemetry
Tommy Brenkley was a gifted mechanic and became an engineer. and could
make anything he put his hand to. making a perfectly running order steam
engine in miniture
Jane was called 'Janie or Ma'
A caved table of hers is in Te Papa museum and painting books are in the
Turnbull Library.
Jane came out in the 2nd trip of the Hovding with her mother and father
with one suitcase.
Vernon fell off a chair and broke his leg it got infected and he died 3
days later with septasema.
Norwegian people who came to Norsewool for avisit would always go there
and she would have a great chat in Norwegian. She loved to tell stories.
Jane was a midwife and delivered about 100 babies in Norsewood
She always had a apron on. She loved her garden and had green fingers and
got cuttings to grow easily.
Jane married Tom Brenkley and they shifted to Wairoa for a short while in
the sawmills then came back to Norsewood and worked in a butcher shop and
then had a butcher shop themselves then he worked at the Norsewood Dairy
factory then bought the farm down Ormondville Rd. Jane painted pictures
all the time and sold them so they could buy into the farm
One day a well known moaner and complainer started up and Tom slashed her
arm with the butcher's knife, no one ever had trouble with her again,
everyone was delighted. Tom could have a temper when provoked.
Janei was an outstanding woman, everybody liked her and respected her,
Children loved he. Jane often bought autograph books, filled these with
little paintings and then gave them to children for birthdays and when
they were sick. Jane was a storyteller children called to hear her
stories, many about Norway and her arrival in Napier. She always
remembered being frightened when she saw her firsst Maori who had facial
tatoo Ond day she found a Maori in the river with saw marks down his
back, he had escaped from being eaten. Jane remembered wondering if she
should help him.
Jane would call on you with a large bunch of scented roses. As she sat
talking she would eat the roses unthinking.
She often wore her apron about and walked with her haands behind her back
She did not enjoy rearing children and admitted she was not a good mother
(but her children were very proud of her) She told me when I took my
children to visit her that she hated children but she was always good to
them.
She loved wild things and knew all the names of the weeds and wild
flowers and loved the birds pansies and roses. and she loved to carve
with a pen knife.
She had a deep resonant voice and Merle and Pat Lawton can still hear her
voice Merle can still hear her voice and could mimic her. She had a
great laugh it was very deep and loud and you could here here miles away.
She always said exactly what she thought and gave no offence everybody
enjoyed her. She or her children where never interested in sport. Many
people did take offence when Jane was so outspoken. but she was a grand
old lady and churned out her works like a sausage machine she always had
her paints out on the table and any spare moment she had she was
painting. she always went to bed before the sun when down and was up at
first light in the mornings going for long walks picking up anything that
took her fance and taking it home and painting it.
When she was down at the farm she had a 2 acre garden down a large gully
behind the cow shed which was full of shrubs and native plants that she
had picked up on her travels around the place.
She had a maternity hospital down at the farm but wasnt allowed to give
any pain killers and had to send some one out to get the doctor but
usually the baby had arrived before he came. John my brother was born
down there it was a very difficult birth which took days to come and when
he was born his foot was folded back she or Joyce would massage it every
day and it came back to normal
Jane painted at least 20 books and multitudes of pictured, fancy worked
table clothes carved boxes carved maori figorines and firescreens and
anything she could carve
She liked to go to the races with Joyce and she would sit down and paint
ladies hats. She did a book of hats and people.
Jane did some maori paintings for the Wellington expidtion as they
couldnt find and maori's to do the paintings.